Local production

Integral to our model is to manufacture life-saving and life-enhancing products within the countries or regions in which they are to be used to maximise social and economic value. 

In addition to manufacturing exclusively in developing countries, where possible, VALID sources ingredients for its products from indigenous small-holder farmers and local suppliers. This brings major advantages in terms of food security for farmers and, critically, a developmental multiplier effect to local economies – a sustainable approach in the broadest sense.

Local production enables:

  • The development of the indigenous food industry by supporting the local value chain to supply their produce for the manufacturing of our food products. This in turn, enhances additional farming skills;
  • Knowledge and skills transfer on quality food manufacturing;
  • Easier and quicker distribution of the food as consumers are closer to the producers;
  • In many instances, better marketing of the products as they are made from locally available raw materials which have the preference of the population (i.e. taste is already known and accepted);
  • A decrease in the unnecessary movements of food between continents. This, in turn, has a positive impact on our carbon footprint;
  • Less storage time, therefore diminished warehousing costs and food losses;
  • Direct economic benefits through greater incomes for local farmers and more financial contributions to local economies; and increased employment levels – both direct and indirect, a multiplier effect.




Local production enables:

  • The development of the indigenous food industry by supporting the local value chain to supply their produce for the manufacturing of our food products. This in turn, enhances additional farming skills;
  • Knowledge and skills transfer on quality food manufacturing;
  • Easier and quicker distribution of the food as consumers are closer to the producers;
  • In many instances, better marketing of the products as they are made from locally available raw materials which have the preference of the population (i.e. taste is already known and accepted);
  • A decrease in the unnecessary movements of food between continents. This, in turn, has a positive impact on our carbon footprint;
  • Less storage time, therefore diminished warehousing costs and food losses;
  • Direct economic benefits through greater incomes for local farmers and more financial contributions to local economies; and increased employment levels – both direct and indirect, a multiplier effect.

The power of disruptive innovations.

Launch of our new Complementary Food product

Change Leader Interview: Dr. Steve Collins

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